Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

Houston Symphony at Miller: Young stars, no audience vote needed Barnatan, Gaffigan collaborate in explosive debut

06.24.07
Inon Barnatan
Houston Chronicle

Inon Barnatan's made his Houston Symphony debut this summer under James Gaffigan. "Many pianists play Mozart with a reminder to the audience that they are tapering their power and technical wizardry to the smaller demands of the Classical-era composer. Barnatan left no such impression. His light touch, elegant phrasing and occasional outburst of emotional accent seemed the only way he could play the Concerto No. 22 (though I'm sure that in other concertos he offers a showier bravado that would seem just as convincing). Moreover, in the cadenzas Barnatan added intriguing freshness to his performance. The Concerto No. 22 is the only one for which Mozart left no written-out cadenzas (those solo show-off moments near the end of a movement). In Mozart's time, they often were improvised. So, Barnatan adapted the ones of the legendary pianist Alfred Brendel, adding some of his own ideas and, in the third movement, throwing in a phrase or two borrowed from the cadenza of Mozart's pupil Johann Nepomuk Hummel."