Recent News
12.12.18
Keith Lockhart
KEITH LOCKHART JOINS THE ROSTER
12.10.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Classical Album of the Week: Vienna Boys Choir Sings Strauss
WRTI
12.07.18
JoAnn Falletta, Mariss Jansons, David Alan Miller, Peter Oundjian, Patrick Summers, Alexandre Tharaud, Magos Herrera & Brooklyn Rider , Mason Bates, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Academy of St Martin in the Fields , Les Violons du Roy , Anthony Roth Costanzo, Nathan Gunn
2019 Grammy Nominees
Grammy Awards
12.07.18
New York Philharmonic String Quartet , Yefim Bronfman
Bronfman, NY Philharmonic Quartet impress at Linton Series
Cincinnati Business Courier
12.06.18
Aaron Diehl
Pianist Diehl in jazz trio plays varied concert in Palm Beach
Palm Beach Daily News
12.06.18
Julian Wachner
This Is the Best ‘Messiah’ in New York
The New York Times
12.04.18
Sir Andrew Davis
ELGAR The Music Makers. The Spirit of England (Davis)
Gramophone
12.03.18
Chanticleer
Chanticleer Christmas concert, 11/30/18
Divamensch
12.01.18
Ward Stare
Twin pianists deliver impeccable style in ‘Perfect Pairs’ concert
Sarasota Herald Tribune
11.27.18
Richard Kaufman
PHANTOM OF THE OPERA HAUNTS THE SOROYA IN REAL TIME
Broadway World

News archive »

TSO guest conductor surprise hit in extraordinary concert

10.25.14
Chee-Yun
Arizona Daily Star

The audience at Friday night’s Tucson Symphony Orchestra concert was giving José Luis Gomez his well-deserved standing ovation at the end of the night when something interesting happened. A foot-stomping chorus broke out from the orchestra as Gomez returned to the Tucson Music Hall stage for one final bow. He gently touched the shoulder of TSO Concertmaster Lauren Roth, urging her to stand up. But Roth sat still and she and her colleagues stomped a bit louder. It was their ovation for a guest conductor who brought out some remarkable playing from this group in works that challenged their mettle and imaginations. 

Gomez was the surprise hit of the evening, which was no easy task when sharing the stage with the stunning violin soloist Chee-Yun. She herself was nothing short of breathtaking in her solo turn at Tchaikovsky’s technically challenging Violin Concerto in D major. Her pristine 1669 Francesco Ruggieri violin, reportedly buried with its owner and re-emerging in 1991 with no scratches or wear and tear to hint at its antiquity, produced the lushest, most gorgeous sound. There were no wolfs, as she called them, little hiccups and distortions that can muddy the works especially on a piece that demands so much of the musician.

Tchaikovsky penned a lot of notes in his Violin Concerto, and Chee-Yun and her Ruggieri let us hear each one on its own. Then she treated the audience of 1,200 to an encore of Fritz Kreisler's beautiful Recitativo and Scherzo, which Kreisler, a violinist of renown in his day, composed for his friend Eugene Yszÿa.The audience sat in near complete silence — not a single muffled coughs or seat shifting creak could be heard — while she played. It was as if time had stood still for those few minutes and everyone was experiencing the same moment.

Gomez brought out in the orchestra a freshness and vibrancy that sometimes gets lost in the day-to-day of performing. His conducting was measured and taut, yet fluid and flexible, as if the orchestra and conductor were performing as an extension of one another. And for us in the audience, that was pretty thrilling.  

Read the rest of the review here