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Daniil Trifonov dazzling in solo piano concert in Boston

03.14.15
Daniil Trifonov
Mass Live

And when Trifonov took the stage, the applause was thunderous before he even played a single note.

A moment later, he took a brief bow, then quickly sat down and got straight to work.The concert consisted of four pieces: Bach and Liszt's Fantasia and fugue in G minor, Beethoven piano Sonata No. 32 in C minor and Liszt's Transcendental Etudes, along with one brief encore.

Watching Trifonov and listening to those four pieces, I quickly understood what all the fuss is about when it comes to Trifionov. 

Quite simply, Trifonov is the future of classical music, the new king of the keyboard.

Sure, his posture can sometimes be distracting. Often, he looked like he had a hump in his back as he bent and twisted his body into a question mark and his head hovered just inches above the keyboard.

But boy, can he play!

Whether he was performing dazzling feats of dexterity in the two Liszt pieces or seeming to touch the keyboard with a feather while performing the Beethoven sonata, Trifonov earned every single standing ovation he received at the end of the concert.

The second half in particular reminded me of one, long sustained guitar solo worthy of Jimmy Page or Jimi Hendrix in their prime. Trifonov's fingers flashed across the keyboard at blinding speed throughout Liszt's Transcendental Etudes. At several points during this piece, he actually stood up while attacking the keyboard with a vengeance.

The Liszt pieces were the real show stoppers. But personally, I will never forget the way Trifonov played the quieter passages in Beethoven Sonata No. 32. You could have heard a pin drop when he caressed the notes out of the keyboard. The sound was ethereal, magical, sublime.

 

 

 

Read the rest of the review here