Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

Classical CDs Weekly: Elgar, Haydn, Ligeti, Smaro Gregoriadou

07.16.16
Shai Wosner
The Arts Desk

Haydn and Ligeti: Concertos & Capriccios Shai Wosner (piano) Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Nicholas Collon (Onyx)

Pairing Haydn and Ligeti makes such good sense that one wonders why it's not been done more often. There's a good Ligeti quote in pianist Shai Wosner's sleeve note: “Humour and seriousness, for me, always go together” – Ligeti making the point that levity isn't an inferior emotion, but an ingredient which makes music infinitely more approachable and appealing. Wosner's performance of Ligeti's Piano Concerto is a wowzer. You ideally need two brains and three hands to play this piece well. Wosner makes it sound easy, the rattling cross rhythms effortless, the sheer musicality drawing you in. Ligeti's spooky second movement contains one of his blackest jokes. Which I won't spoil for those who haven't experienced it, apart from recommending that you crank the volume up and lower the lights. Nicholas Collon's Danish National Symphony Orchestra are superb accompanists, the xylophonist and principal horn deserving special mention. Wosner also includes Liget's early solo Capriccio, both drily appealing miniatures.

Two Capriccios by Haydn are also thrown in, one of which includes specific instructions for the pianist to hold a note until the sound disappears completely – the effect of which can make the player look as if they've forgotten what comes next. And there's a pair of Haydn's best-known piano concertos. The faster movements are as sly as you'd expect – the 11th concerto's “Rondo all'Ungarese” is breathtaking, but Wosner and Collon score extra points by handling the slow movements with such tender affection – no. 4's “Adagio” a case in point. A terrific disc, and superbly recorded to boot.

Read the full article here.