Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

A Power Trio Highlights Mendelssohn

05.06.10
Emanuel Ax, Yo-Yo Ma
The New York Times

By Vivien Schweitzer

After celebrations of the Mendelssohn bicentennial last year, the spotlight has shifted to this year’s Schumann and Chopin anniversaries. But the pianist Emanuel Ax, the cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the violinist Itzhak Perlman shifted attention back to Mendelssohn for much of their “Live From Lincoln Center” broadcast from the Kaplan Penthouse on Wednesday evening.

These genial superstars, who interspersed their fine music- making with engaging commentary, opened the program with the Scherzo from Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in D minor, which Mr. Perlman described as a perfect example of the composer’s vivacious style. Many listeners, he added, consider Mendelssohn, a happy child prodigy who composed his marvelous String Octet at 16, a rival to Mozart in terms of teenage brilliance.

Mendelssohn was certainly a master of melody, a genius particularly evident in his “Songs Without Words.” Mr. Ax and Mr. Perlman offered a gracious performance of one of them (Op. 19, No. 1), and Mr. Ax and Mr. Ma, playing with a rich tone, followed with another (Op. 109).

For the Adagio from Mendelssohn’s Cello Sonata in D, Mr. Ma played the 1712 Davidoff Stradivarius, the same instrument the Polish count and cellist Mateusz Wielhorski used to perform the work, with Mendelssohn in the audience. Mr. Ax and Mr. Ma offered a richly hued interpretation of the Adagio, whose chorale reflects Mendelssohn’s admiration of Bach.

The finale of Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in C minor, a work here played complete, also quotes a chorale. The players’ passionate interpretation of the first movement earned lengthy applause.

The concert also featured several “Phantasiestücke” (“Fantasy Pieces”) by Schumann, who called Mendelssohn “the Mozart of the 19th century, the most illuminating of musicians.” Mr. Ax and Schumann share the same birthday, Mr. Ma pointed out, June 8. But Mr. Ax doesn’t have any “imaginary friends,” Mr. Ma added, referring to Schumann’s alter egos, Florestan and Eusebius.

Mr. Ax accompanied Mr. Perlman, who played with a sweet tone, in the “Phantasiestück” (Op. 73, No 1). Mr. Ma and Mr. Ax offered a vivid rendition of the first of Schumann’s “Fünf Stücke im Volkston” (“Five Pieces in Folk Style”).
 
Then it was back to Mendelssohn for the encore, the second movement of the D minor Trio, whose elegiac opening Mr. Ax performed beautifully.